Feeds

Security firm takes trusted Linux onboard

Trustix slips into the Comodo

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Secure Linux operating system and software provider Trustix was today acquired by internet security company Comodo. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Comodo, which is best known as a certification authority for SSL certificates, said that the deal will allow the developers of Trustix to take advantage of Comodo’s sizeable R&D labs to further improve Trustix's software for the benefit of the Linux community at large.

The Trustix portfolio of Small Business and Enterprise class Linux-based products will be extended to offer a "complete business package" from Comodo.

“With Trustix on board we can immediately roll out secured firewalls, proxy, web, mail and LAN servers to the many customers who have been clamouring for such a solution from Comodo,” said Melih Abdulhayoglu, Chief Security Architect, Comodo. “It is critical that companies of all sizes focus on IT security and today’s acquisition of Trustix gives Comodo the opportunity to offer a comprehensive set of proven business solutions.”

Comodo, which was founded in 1998, has already developed a number of security technologies as a result of its research and development efforts. The company holds a number of patents in the US and UK.

Comodo developed SEEOS as a complete security operating system to underpin a range of access management and secure messaging products and services.

The company is also developing a keyboard controller (called SIDEN) featuring improved security technologies designed to get around the problem of keyboard sniffers. Designed as a component to fit within the Trusted Computing Platform Alliance, SIDEN chips feature a way to extend secure SSL tunnels down to the keyboard. By going for an indirect revenue model (making money on services rather than the device itself) Comodo hopes to keep the cost of the controller to OEMs down to same level as traditional keyboard controllers.

Comodo demoed the technology at Microsoft's recent WinHEC development conference. It is partnering with Chartered Semiconductors and packaging firm Atlantic Technology in plans to put the technology in silicon by the end of March next year.

Steve Roylance, Technical Marketing Director at Comodo, said it was talking to OEMs like Fujitsu about the technology, which has been designed to plug into the next major release of Windows, Longhorn. Longhorn will provide OS and application support for the product, one of the elements needed for the technolgy to take off.

Longhorn isn't expected until 2006 but Comodo's Roylance has a neat line in explaining the future need for its security technology.

"Because contract staff could easily put a keyboard sniffing device on corporate PCs, large enterprises are only as secure as their cleaning company," he told The Register. ®

Related Stories

Trustix clinches China Secure Linux deal
Network security tailored to Small.biz
Of TCPA, Palladium and Wernher von Braun
Now MS trails 2006 for Windows Longhorn
Bill Gates: 'Longhorn is going to be late'

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.