Feeds

Toshiba launches VGA, Wi-Fi PDA

e805 offers 802.11b, 480 x 640 display

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Website security in corporate America

Toshiba this morning launched its e805 PDA, bringing a 4in transflective 480 x 640 VGA screen to the Pocket PC platform for the first time.

Bizarrely, Toshiba is emphasising not the device's screen size but its wireless capabilities, probably because - as we

noted

yesterday - there's almost no application support out there for the larger display size. Other apps shift the display into the standard 240 x 320 mode.

The best Toshiba can offer right now is a version of its ClearVue application that can handle a VGA screen and the promise that the e805 is "a sound investment for future VGA-enabled applications".

Fingers crossed, guys...

Back to the wireless side of the story, the e805 features integrated 802.11b wireless connectivity and a bundled Voice over IP (VoIP) application. Toshiba's chosen telephony service provider, in the US, is VLI - a subscription with that company is necessary to use the e805's VoIP function, Toshiba said. VLI provided the VoIP software.

The PDA also contains software that speaks text documents, email messages, diary entries and the like out loud. The device itself can be set to respond to voice commands.

The new model also features "enhanced" screen brightness, though Toshiba is offering an optional Presentation Pack - essentially an RGB adaptor with a built-in USB port - for users who want to hook up a monitor or projector to the PDA.

As expected, the device is powered by an Intel XScale PCA263 processor clocked to 400MHz. It contains 128MB of SDRAM, 32MB of Flash ROM and a 32MB Flash disk. It integrates a CompactFlash slot and an SD Card slot, plus the obligatory infrared port. The screen is driven by an ATI graphics chip.

The machine measures 13.3 x 7.5 x 1.5cm (5.3 x 3 x 0.6in) and weighs 192.8g (6.8oz). It runs Windows Mobile 2003. The Lithium Ion battery is removable, and Toshiba has nicely included a physical on/off switch for the 802.11b adaptor to help save battery power.

The e805 goes on sale today in the US through Toshiba's retail and resale channels for $599. The company will be selling it direct, via its web site, as the e800. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.