Feeds

Remote access provider expands Euro Wi-Fi coverage

Gric picks Cloud, PicoPoint, Monzoon

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

Three European Wi-Fi networks - UK's The Cloud, Switzerland's Monzoon and the Netherlands' PicoPoint - have agreed to allow US enterprise-oriented remote access solutions provider Gric Communicatins to offer its customers WLAN access via their hotspots.

Gric currently has over 3000 Wi-Fi and fixed network access points in 20 countries, sold to its corporate customers as the Gric Tier One Network. To date, Gric has signed agreements with 48 Wi-Fi service providers in 32 countries.Today's deal adds at least 2200 hotspots to that tally in the UK, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany, Luxembourg and South Africa.

The Cloud has an aggressive hotspot roll-out programme and plans to have over 2500 in place by the end of the year. This summer it signed a deal with payphone provider NWP to install Wi-Fi access points across NWP's network. While the roll-out is a slow one, the deal gives The Cloud a potential base of 10,000 hotspots.

Monzoon, by contrast, has around 50 hotspots of its own. PicoPoint can offer only 75 right now. Like The Cloud, PicoPoint recently signed a roaming deal with US hotspot aggregator Boingo. Boingo has also signed a deal with Gric rival Infonet, which also offers secure remote access services to corporates.

What all this deal activity is doing is paving the way for mass Wi-Fi coverage delivered by providers all around the world. At this rate, users will easily be able to roam from one network to another. And if individuals and companies don't trade with network providers directly, said providers will accrue revenue through deals with firms that offer remote access services.

Key to making all this work are robust, integrated billing systems which ensure no matter where a user joins the network, his or her access fees - or a proportion of them - get delivered to all the parties with a financial interest: the hotspot owner, the host location, the network aggregator, the actual network to which the user has subscribed and other access service providers. ®

Related Stories

Infonet picks Boingo to host corporate Wi-Fi services
The Cloud drifts into Europe with Wi-Fi deals

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.