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Intel spammer comes up short in California governor bid

Anti-offshore campaign denied

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The great Intel spammer Ken Hamidi has come up short in a bid for the California governor's seat with just a few friends and strangers backing his anti-offshore worker platform.

Hamidi earned but 1,664 votes, at the time of this report, versus the 3.6 million raked in by the Terminator and serial groper Arnold Schwarzenegger. This places Hamidi in about thirtieth place, sitting with porn stars, porn magnates and small actors who also failed to win the race.

Seeing little hope at victory, Hamidi backed California' new muscle-bound chief ahead of the race with a "Join Arnold" note posted on his Web site. Like many, Hamidi is calling for "Unity" in California, which could be a dangerous platform for female Californians given Arnold's ass-grabbing resume.

Hamidi is not a fan of big business. He sued Intel into submission earlier this year, winning the right to complain about his former employer. Building on this success, Hamidi called for an overhaul of California's offshore worker policies. He wanted to "create incentives to keep jobs in California, keep high tech jobs in California and not create an environment in which exporting or off-shoring jobs are encouraged and to impose tariffs on imported offshore employees brought to California by way of L1 Visas."

It's hard to say if Arnold holds some of these same principles dear. The actor has been short on actual strategy for the state. He does, however, seem to be a big fan of g-strings, which is nice.

California tech workers need advocates such as Hamidi like never before. After being hit with massive layoffs in recent years, homegrown workers are now seeing companies such as Intel and HP move jobs offshore at pace. ®

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Intel CEO admits: jobs aren't coming back to US
US set to make massive H1-B visa cuts
IBM lays off 15,000, HP 1300
Court gives Intel spammer all clear
Intel v. Hamidi case tests Net freedoms

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