Feeds

Fossil blames Flextronics for Wrist PDA delay

Even as the device's manufacturer successfully sued for $1bn

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Watch maker Fossil has blamed the latest set-back to the release of its Palm OS-based Wrist PDA squarely on its manufacturing partner, Flextronics.

That claim comes a day after Flextronics was ordered to pay almost $1 billion in damages by a California jury.

Following The Register's exclusive story last Thursday detailing the company's decision to delay the device's release yet again, the company on Friday released a statement on matter.

The statement clarifies the "production quality" issues raised by the Fossil spokeswoman we talk to the day before. Says Fossil: "Flextronics, our production partner, has been unable to meet initial inventory requirements for the launch."

We understand that the devices may have been ready to ship but were recalled after a last-minute glitch was exposed. We have been given a late Q4 2003/ Q1 2004 release date, but Fossil's official line is that there is no rescheduled ship date.

"Once production complications have been resolved and product quality specifications have been met or exceeded, Fossil will begin shipments of the Wrist PDA with Palm OS," the company said on Friday.

This latest set-back is the third time the Wrist PDA's release date has been put back. Originally due to ship on 30 June, the device was then pegged for late July availability. As that timeframe approached, the release was put back to 30 September.

Back in June, we reported that the Wrist PDA would not ship until early 2004, a date given to us by an official Fossil UK representative. The US parent quickly denied the claim, but it's increasingly clear that the UK information was correct all along.

Flextronics, meanwhile, has other problems: last week, as we broke the Fossil story, a California jury found the contract manufacturer guilty of fraud, economic duress and having been in breach of contract.

The company was sued by Dovatron, which in 1997 contracted a firm called Beckman Coulter to make blood analysis equipment. BC was subsequently acquired by Flextronics in 2000, a year before Dovatron's manufacturing contract was due to expire.

The jury ordered Flextronics to pay $3 million in compensation and $931 million in punitive damages. The manufacturer has said it will appeal against the verdict. ®

Related Stories

Amazon.com drops Fossil Wrist PDA
Fossil puts back Palm Wrist PDA launch to 2004

Related Products
Buy Palm Tungsten E and T3 from the Register's PDA store

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.