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Tundra buys PowerPC tech for $20m

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Just days after a mis-timed press release forced Tundra to announce it hadn't purchased Motorola's PowerPC Host Bridge products but was simply in talks with the processor maker, the company has said the sale has gone through.

Tundra will pay $20 million for the two-part product line, which its will rename the Tsi106 and Tsi107. They were formerly known as the MPC106 and MPC107.

In addition, Tundra will work with Motorola on the development of future PowerPC Bridge products. Tundra has been a Motorola partner for some time system interconnect design partner for some time. It took over Motorola's RapidIO design work back in September 2000, allowing the chip giant to concentrate on processors rather than chipset logic. The PowerPC Bridge deal is a logical extension of the RapidIO relationship.

"This agreement strengthens our System Interconnect portfolio, and extends our relationships with customers within our target markets," said Jim Roche, president and chief executive of Tundra, in a statement. ®

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