Feeds

Philips and HP to share virtual data centre

'On demand' for real

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Philips Semiconductors and Hewlett Packard will share a fully virtualised data centre that reduces IT costs and enables an infrastructure that responds in real time to market changes in a highly changeable semiconductor industry.

The UDC, the first of its kind, is located at Philips Semiconductors' largest site in Nijmegen, near the German border in the Netherlands, and is managed from a single console where server and storage resources can be allocated virtually, within minutes, instead of having to physically re-wire the desired hardware.

The centre accommodates both new and existing servers, as well as storage and network equipment, from HP and other vendors.

The announcement is significant, as it is the first major 'on demand' UDC deal of HP in Europe. HP outlined its Adaptive Enterprise strategy - which centres around a reference architecture called Darwin - only a couple of months ago.

Aiming at companies and chief information officers that demand more out of their IT environments, on demand or utility computing entails that data centres can be allocated to different tasks to increase efficiency.

IBM has been pursuing a similar strategy for months, and other companies have jumped on the bandwagon as well, including Computer Associates, which believes HP is too focused on its own proprietary technology.

So far, Hewlett-Packard announced only a few services agreements, including a deal worth $3 billion to manage Procter & Gamble's overall IT infrastructure for 10 years, and a outsourcing contract with Ericsson.

Dutch retail trade company KBB also implemented an HP demand strategy, but the IT giant undoubtedly needed a more prominent European partner after white goods giant Electrolux this summer outsourced its desktops to IBM in a seven year on demand services deal and beverage giant Diageo (that's Guinness and Grand Met to you and me) was spirited away from HP in another on demand deal.

HP and Philips' semiconductor division have a long-standing customer relationship. Two years ago, HP began assisting Philips with the development of blueprints for the management of data centers at minimum cost. The Nijmegen site is just the beginning, sources at HP say.

Philips Semiconductors, headquartered in Eindhoven, employs over 32,000 people in over 50 countries. With sales of around $ 4.6 billion in 2002, it is one of the world's top semiconductor suppliers with 14 manufacturing and assembly sites, 20 design centers, four system labs and more than 100 offices. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
'Urika': Cray unveils new 1,500-core big data crunching monster
6TB of DRAM, 38TB of SSD flash and 120TB of disk storage
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
SDI wars: WTF is software defined infrastructure?
This time we play for ALL the marbles
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Oracle hires former SAP exec for cloudy push
'We know Larry said cloud was gibberish, and insane, and idiotic, but...'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.