IT services at work are pants

New workers wait weeks for PCs, help, says study

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Two in five workers are dissatisfied with IT services at work, according to a survey out yesterday.

According to the study, sponsored by IT services software firm newScale, workers can wait for up to two weeks for a response to routine IT service requests. Other respondents reported that it took several weeks after starting a new job to get the computer equipment they needed to perform their job functions.

Of the 1000 Americans quizzed during the study by Internet market research firm TNS, 43 per cent believe computer and network services caused unnecessary delays and poor quality of services impacted their ability to work effectively.

Ouch.

The study quizzed people on the routine provisioning of employee workplace tools like computers, phones and access to IT systems required to perform day-to-day operations - otherwise known as internal service delivery management.

According to a recent report (Service Catalogs: The Heart of Service Delivery Management, September 2003) by Forrester Research, internal service delivery costs are between three and 15 per cent of a company's total revenues. The cost related to poor service delivery represents a tax on the finances and productivity of corporations, according to newScale.

newScale claims that companies using management software to organise service delivery can reduce costs by up to 30 per cent. It wants companies to consider using its software as an alternative to outsourcing services or blaming hard pressed BOFHs for lacklustre IT support. ®

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