Feeds

Intel pushes Centrino with One Unwired Day

Keith Richards' dream

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Those of you in San Francisco, Chicago and New York may have noticed something peculiar today as Intel kicked off a Centrino celebration called One Unwired Day.

Users in these fine cities are being treated to 24 hours of free wireless access at various locations, including Intel partner sites such as Starbucks and McDonalds. Intel is also hosting some "special events" where consumers can try out Centrino-powered laptops, see demos and win prizes. It's a regular wireless hoedown.

One Unwired Day - something Keith Richards cannot relate to - confirms Intel's aggressive aspirations with its combo mobile/wireless chip technology. The company has backed Centrino with hundreds of millions of dollars and managed to muscle its way in on a market prized by Atheros and others. While Intel remains behind competitors in delivering 802.11a/g kit, it has ties to PC OEMs that competitors can only dream of.

Intel is using its near monopoly in PC processors as a sharp business tool to be sure, but this should not come as a real shocker. This is what massive corporations tend to do.

Still, there are fragile minds out there that don't appreciate Intel's approach. ZDNet's David Berlind, for example, has become trapped in a self-constructed Centrino debate. His recent Intel attack shows a profound knack for dissecting PowerPoint presentations and little else.

The real Centrino debate should center in on the potential victims of Intel's wireless push. It's companies such as Starbucks, T-Mobile, HP and McDonalds that are swallowing the wireless hype whole with no payback in sight. Intel is doing its part to help out, but the per users hotspot revenue just is not there.

Intel, however, has come up with some creative ideas about where the true value of a hotspot lies. Here's a handy list of "cool" things to do unwired. In a very anti-PC fashion, Intel did not provide a list of uncool things to do unwired.

Whether or not twenty-four hours of free wireless access will be enough to convince anyone of Centrino's value remains to be seen. But you can't blame Intel for giving the proven "first taste is free" business model a try. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.