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Bust PC builder lands ICM with huge piracy bill

MS comes calling

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ICM Computer Group has been landed with a huge bill for buying pirated software unwittingly from an unnamed distributor.

The disaster recovery specialist has set aside £725,000 to cover its obligations to Microsoft, of which £400,000 has already made its way to the software giant.

In a statement accompanying its results yesterday, ICM said it had bought the counterfeit software as part of a routine hardware and software supply agreement from a "large PC manufacturer" between two and five years ago. The vendor had a direct OEM relationship with Microsoft. However counterfeit software produced by a "major" network had found its way into ICM's supplier.

ICM said it would have sought redress from the PC maker, except the supplier went bust in October 2002. Doesn't ring any bells with us. any names?

Update The reader consensus was Dan Technology even though that well-known firm went bust in July 2002. The name of ICM's supplier was ASI, although how that company qualifies as a "major" PC maker escapes us. ®

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