Feeds

On mobile phones and spam

Over complicated minds

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Best practices for enterprise data

Forrester Research recently published a forecast and analysis of European Mobile messaging growth, writes Bob McDowall of Bloor Research. The analyst firm forecasts that Short message services will peak and basically plateau in 2004 and years beyond, and forecasts 100 per cent compound annual growth in enhanced message services, multimedia message services, instant message services and e-mail using next generation phones in 2004 and beyond.

Much of this will be generated through direct marketing now being adopted by more large multinational beyond the communications sector. Much of this will be unsolicited; much of it is really nothing more than spam.

Spam may be an irritation when delivered to the PC/laptop via the Internet but it is even more irritating when delivered to the mobile phone, an instrument of continual torture to many of its business users in particular. Of most concern is that the benefits of advances in mobile technology will be tarnished by their association with its main uses.

Various national legal regimes are trying to control Spam. The variations of opting in or opting out by the recipient user are somewhat cumbersome efforts by legislators to address the issues of Spam. Such initiatives tend to become embroiled in debates over privacy/ freedom of information/security and are then complicated by the overcomplicated minds of the legal profession, politicians and those who delight in the abstractions of rights and duties.

The most expedient course of action would be initiatives taken by the providers of the mobile technology. For example in Japan DoCoMo is limiting the number of text messages which a user can send. Others mobile providers are seeking to deploy filtering services on their appliances to defeat the growth of spam. Vodafone for example will also provide a feature to forward spam to regulators or complaint authorities.

These initiatives are both socially responsible and may ensure that the technology benefits are not cannibalised or debased by those who have a very singular use or application for the technology.

© IT-Analysis.com

Recommendations for simplifying OS migration

More from The Register

next story
Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms
Readers chat to the pair who flog the tech
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?