Feeds

Dutch spammer to appear in US court

FTC sues Martijn Bevelander

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Infographic

Dutch mass spammer Martijn Bevelander may have to appear before a federal judge. The Federal Trade Commission has filed an amended complaint in its pending federal court action against US spam flooder Brian Westby, and added as defendants Martijn Bevelander, and two Dutch companies, Maps Holding B.V. and PB Planning & Services B.V.

The Commission's original complaint, announced on April 17, 2003, alleged that Westby sent consumers sexually explicit spam with deceptive subject lines that disguised the content.

Dutch Internet entrepreneur Martijn Beverlander was exposed this summer by the BBC as a mass spammer. As well as hosting pornographic websites for notorious spam gangs such as Superzonda, Bevelander had allegedly sent large quantities of spam for mostly American clients through an Amsterdam-based subsidiary called CyberAngels.

Even more revealing was that Bevelander had teamed up with Brian Westby, who had to appear for a U.S. District Court in April for running an allegedly illegal spam operation that used deceptively bland subject lines, false return addresses and empty "reply-to" links to expose internet users, including children, to sexually explicit material.

Westby, who like Bevelander is in his early twenties, was on the board of Maps Holding (SPAM spelled backwards) until May this year. Westby is considered to be one of the most active purveyors of pornographic junk e-mail. According to the FTC, Westby has netted at least $1 million from his porn operations. ®

Related stories

Dutch mass spammer loses grip
US anti-spam laws 'will legalise spam'
Earthlink brings down the Buffalo Spammer
AOL wins $7m in spam case
Evil spammers jailed for two years
AOL spammer pleads guilty to forgery
Rise of the Spam Zombies
On Spam cures that are worse than the disease
Anti-spam packages 'too unreliable' to certify

Fab O'Really T'shirt at Cash and Carrion
How to deal with Spammers - permanently

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Airbus promises Wi-Fi – yay – and 3D movies (meh) in new A330
If the person in front reclines their seat, this could get interesting
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.