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Micron ships DDR 2 to ‘Lindenhurst’ server vendors

Certified for use with Intel's upcoming Xeon DP chipset

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Micron today became the latest memory manufacturer to win Intel approval for the use of its DDR 2 SDRAM in the chip giant's upcoming server chipsets. It also said that it had begun shipping DIMMs to "major OEM customers".

Micron will offer 256MB and 512MB registered DIMMs based on 400MHz and 533MHz 256Mb DDR 2 chips for Intel's 'Lindenhurst' and 'Lindenhurst-VS' chipsets, Xeon DP-oriented products due for release early next year and aimed at volume and value markets, respectively.

Micron's DDR 2 DIMMs will presumably work with Intel's Xeon MP 'Twin Castle' chipset, though they have yet to be validated by the chip giant for that chipset. Twin Castle is due mid-2004.

Lindenhurst will support Nacona, Intel's next generation of Xeon DP processor, also due to ship early next year.

"256Mb-based DDR2 registered DIMM modules provide unique advantages for server platforms - the 256MB density enables lower-cost 512MB dual channel systems and the 512MB density enables chip-kill ECC in 1GB server systems," said Terry Lee, executive director at Micron. ®

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