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BT Broadcast Services (BTBS) is to make it easier to deliver live streaming media video feeds to mobile users courtesy of a technology deal with Vemotion.

The approach allows streaming media to be delivered to users with GPRS, as well as higher speed 3G connections.

Vemotion's technology includes the FastStart capability, which halves video start-up times; Layered Download, which improves quality with each viewing of a clip, and Mobile Aware features to enhance user experience in harsh network conditions. The technology is also the first in the world to meet the emerging H.264 international standard, which doubles video quality for the same data rate as MPEG-4.

Vemotion's technology incorporates patented components developed by BT Exact (the research arm of BT). Vemotion and BT Broadcast Services are marketing their service offering to content providers and mobile operators.

Antoniou said Vemotion was already talking to TV companies about the delivery of sport and content based on a "mass participation" TV programme to mobile phones. TV companies are interested in making the service as easy to use as possible, he added.

Firms in the music industry and financial services market are also in the technology, according to Vemotion.

Vemotion is an independent company operating mobile video hosting services.

The most popular video applications currently available are music videos, cartoons, sports and news clips, video alerts and video greetings. Users pay from 30 pence to watch clips lasting between 20 seconds and four minutes.

Vemotion's technology allows users to watch live events, access content on demand, or download clips for later viewing.

Using patented technology from BTexact, Vemotion delivers full-colour video services to the latest mobile phones and PDAs such as the Nokia 7650 and 3650, SonyEricsson P800, O2 XDA and HP iPAQ. ®

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