Feeds

Blaster-F suspect charged with cybercrime

Admits modifying worm code

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A 24-year-old man suspected of releasing a relatively tame variant of the Blaster worm has been charged with cybercrime offences by Romanian police.

If found guilty, Dan Dumitru Ciobanu could face a maximum of 15 years in prison under Romania's strict new computer crime laws.

According to police, Ciobanu has admitted spreading Blaster-F, but claims that its release was accidental. Unlike the original worm, AV vendors describe Blaster-F as "low spreading and low risk".

Ciobanu reportedly claimed that the virus spread itself only because he tested it while his computer was connected to the Internet.

"He has been charged with illegal and major disturbing of informatics systems and for holding illegal software," Liviu Zamfirescu, a police officer from the suspect's home city of Iasi in Northern Romania, told Reuters.

According to a police statement, Ciobanu admitted that he modified the original Blaster worm by switching filenames used by the virus, and inserting a piece of Romanian text into the code. The text, when translated into English, reads:

Don't go to the Hydrotechnics faculty!!! You are wasting your time... Birsan, your pension awaits!!! I urinate on the diploma!!!!!!

"Some people may think only 'geniuses' are capable of writing viruses, however this is far from the truth," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos Anti-Virus. "In the past we have seen some virus writers include their full name, address and job history inside their malicious code. If Ciobanu is found to be guilty, the vital clue may have been that a childish rant against a university lecturer was there for all to see."

Ciobanu has been released from custody, and no date has been set for his trial.

In late August the FBI arrested Jeffrey Lee Parson in connection with another variant, B, of the Blaster worm.

The author of the original Blaster worm remains at large. ®

Related Stories

Blaster worm spreading rapidly
Blaster worm variants make mischief
Blaster rewrites Windows worm rules
Windows Update still standing despite Blaster
Blaster variant offers 'fix' for pox-ridden PCs
FBI arrests Blaster suspect
Parson not dumbest virus writer ever, shock!
Feds sexed up case - Blaster suspect
Blaster-F suspect arrested in Romania

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.