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Freeserve in ‘no risk’ BB offer

Breaking up [with Dixons] is so very hard to do

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Freeserve today announced a "no risk" offer for its broadband service - on the same day that news of its distribution deal with Dixons had finally collapsed.

Punters signing up for Freeserve's broadband service will receive their modem and connection kit for free, and will be charged £27.99 for the first month's fee.

If they like it, then they carry on paying each month as usual. If they don't, they can hand back their modem and connection kit and have their £27.99 refunded.

According to Freeserve's research, customers are reluctant to sign up for broadband because it is a "great unknown".

"They are afraid to commit to Broadband without having trialled the product first," said Keith Hawkins of Freeserve. "Our new offer allows them to do just that."

Freeserve's "no risk" offer runs until the end of December. ®

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