Feeds

FBI arrests Blaster suspect

The worm turned

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Federal authorities have arrested a teenager on suspicion of creating and distributing one of the variants of the prolific Blaster worm earlier this month.

Jeffrey Lee Parson, 18, was arrested today and is due to make a court appearance in St. Paul, Minnesota, this afternoon. His arrest follows a search of his home at Hopkins, Minnesota, by FBI and Secret Service agents on Tuesday, where seven computers were seized.

Parson (AKA teekid or t33kid) reportedly admitted to FBI Special Agent Eric Smithmier that he modified the original Blaster worm and created a more destructive variant. Parson, who's reportedly 6 foot 4 inches tall and weighs 320 pounds, is alleged to have run a website where viruses were available for download.

Investigators believe a separate, as yet unidentified, individual created the original Blaster worm.

"The crime-fighting authorities have moved quickly in this case - sending a strong message that law enforcement agencies around the world are getting better at catching cyber-criminals," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos Anti-Virus. "It is to be hoped that other budding virus writers think twice before unleashing their worms on innocent computer users."

The Blaster-B variant of the worm was released on August 13 two days after the original worm. Like the original, Blaster-B targets the same Remote Procedure Call (RPC) DCOM vulnerability in Windows to spread.

Blaster and variants created widespread network congestion and infected hundreds of thousands of computers. The worm was also programmed to launch a DDoS attack from infected computers on Windowsupdate.com. In the event, this attack failed. ®

Related Stories

Blaster worm spreading rapidly
Blaster worm variants make mischief
Blaster rewrites Windows worm rules
Windows Update still standing despite Blaster
Blaster variant offers 'fix' for pox-ridden PCs
Feds close in on Blaster suspect

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.