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Amazon.com cracks down on spoofers

Files multi-million dollar lawsuits

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Amazon.com is demanding millions of dollars in punitive damages from 11 'spoofers' accused of sending forged Amazon emails, according to lawsuits filed against the alleged forgers.

The lawsuits, which target operators based in the US and Canada, are part of a wider crackdown by the online retailer against email forgeries, a trick known as 'spoofing'.

Spoofing is an illegal, deceptive online marketing ploy that conceals the true identity of an email sender and falsely identifies someone else as the sender, explained Amazon.

Those fingered by Amazon include operators selling everything from home appliances and car warranties to human growth hormones.

Said Amazon.com's Associate General Counsel David Zapolsky in a statement: "Spoofers lie about who's really sending these emails. Spoofing is forgery, and we're going after spoofers to the full extent of the law.

"Spoofing is a problem faced by any company with a trusted domain name that uses e-mail to communicate with its customers.

"It's not just spam, it's consumer fraud. And the actions taken today by Amazon.com and by the state of New York will send a strong message to anyone engaged in this conduct that it will not be tolerated.@

One of those targeted by Amazon.com, Cyebye.com, has already settled its case. It has agreed to stop spoofing and pay $10,000 in penalties.

Details of the lawsuits and Amazon's crackdown can be found at the company's anti-spoofing site. ®

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