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Invisible Networks confirms restructuring

'Changing demands of projects' to blame for job cuts

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Invisible Networks - the Cambridge-based wireless networks outfit that helps bring broadband to rural areas - claims it was forced to lay-off staff because of the "changing demands of projects" it was working on.

In a statement issued on Friday, the company said that the restructuring has enabled it to "refocus its expertise" and that it is now in a "strong position to grow and move forward in a fast-expanding industry".

And in a bid to reassure its existing punters the company said: "Existing networks will not be affected by the restructuring, with the 3 networks of the Cambridge Ring continuing in to be supported and incremental growth to these networks in areas where it is cost-effective to build."

The Register reported last week that Invisible Networks had made a number of people redundant.

According to sources, around 22 people worked at the company before the redundancies. Now there are just a dozen or so. ®

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Invisible Networks confirms job losses

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