Feeds

BT forces closure of non-BT ADSL checker

Claims Data Protection Act infringement

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

A software developer from Suffolk has been forced to shut down his ADSL availability checker following legal threats from BT that making the information available breached the Data Protection Act.

Although based on BT's own ADSL availability checker, Dan Lane's line checker was able to provide more technical data after he obtained information he claims is freely available from some ISPs.

BT disputes this, claiming the information was "published in error by one of our resellers".

BT wrote to Mr Lane calling on him to stop making the information available, alleging that his checker was in breach of section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998, which "makes it an offence knowingly to obtain or disclose personal data".

On Monday, they sent him a letter from the telco's legal department calling on him to stop.

Said the letter: "BT seeks to keep confidential the details of products that our customers take from us. Using BT confidential information that was published in error by one of our resellers, it appears that you have been providing access to such information.

The letter asked for Mr Lane to stop doing so.

A defiant Mr Lane claimed what he was doing was "perfectly legal" and called on BT to explain why he was being singled out when the information was available elsewhere.

Now, though, his access to the information has been blocked and Mr Lane has little choice but to dismantle his ADSL line checker.

"I'm pretty pissed off," he told The Register. "I tried to work with BT on this. Although they’ve shut me down, the information is still out there and is still available."

BT declined to comment directly on the case. Instead, a spokesman for the monster telco said: "BT has worked with the Information Commissioner to ensure all the responses on our bt.com/broadband availability checker are compliant with the Data Protection Act.

"We are currently investigating Data Protection Act issues surrounding the accessing and possible misuse of information without BT's consent.

"We are seeking to resolve any issues appropriately and prevent any further breach of data protection legislation," he said. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.