Feeds

802.11g drives Wi-Fi sales

But 802.11b still rules the roost

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

The Wi-Fi market continues to grow, but price pressures are driving revenue and sales growth apart, market researcher the Dell'Oro Group said yesterday.

During Q2, worldwide shipments of 802.11-based kit were up six per cent on the first quarter's figure and a massive 69 per cent up on the same period last year.

However, Wi-Fi revenues totalled $149 million during the quarter up just two per cent from Q1's total of $146 million, and ten per cent above Q2 2002's $134.1 million.

The unit growth was lead by shipments of 802.11g products, which jumped 48 per cent over Q1 to account for 24 per cent of that $149 million and 23 per cent of all Wi-Fi units shipped in the quarter. Its lower-spec. sibling, 802.11b, continues to lead the market by volume, accounting for 76 per cent of units shipped.

That leaves just one per cent of the Wi-Fi market devoted to dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz products - slightly more if the figures Dell'Oro quotes have been rounded up. Pure-play 802.11a products barely troubled the score-keeper. Dual-band shipments remained static between Q1 and Q2; revenues were down a fraction.

Dual-band isn't expected to make much of an impact until next year when Intel is expected to ship 802.11a/g modules for its Centrino platform. In any case, falling 802.11g prices, driven by new Taiwanese market entrants, will force established players to promote dual-band and 802.11a as an upgrade from 802.11b and g.

Falling 802.11b prices had a big impact on vendors' revenues: despite rising shipments, revenues fell ten per cent on Q1's figure, Dell'Oro said.

Dell'Oro didn't offer vendor market share figures, but it did say Cisco was the Wi-Fi market leader, followed by Buffalo, Linksys, D-Link and Netgear. ®

Related Stories

Wired not wireless to dominate home LAN market
70% of Brits don't know what a Wi-Fi hotspot is
Wi-Fi to be embedded in 95% of notebooks by 2005
Taiwanese chip makers prepare 802.11g assault

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.