Feeds

UMC to pay up to $130m for Infineon fab JV share

Cost of switching to IBM

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

UMC will pay Infineon $100-130 million to buy the memory maker's 30 per cent stake in their Singapore-based 300m wafer fab joint venture.

So says an unnamed UMC source, cited by Dow Jones.

The payment follows Infineon's decision, announced last week, to quit the JV. At the same time, the company said it would be working with IBM and Chartered Silicon to develop 65nm and smaller chip fabrication processes.

Having previously partnered with UMC on 90nm and under process development, the IBM/Chartered announcement effectively marked the end of Infineon's development work with UMC.

Infineon's decision to pull out of the Singapore fab project marks the end of its plant construction work with UMC, too.

UMC will gain Infineon's 30 per cent stake in the fab, adding to the majority interest it already holds. The only other major shareholder is Singapore's Economic Development Board, which owns 15 per cent of the plant. The JV was formed in 2001 and is expected to go into volume production next year. ®

Related Story

IBM to partner with Infineon on 65, 45nm tech

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?