Feeds

SuSE and IBM secure Linux for the Feds

Open source lockdown

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

SuSE and IBM have moved a step closer to some meaty government and military contracts by helping Linux pass muster on a key security standard.

The two vendors have met Evaluation Assurance Level 2+ (EAL2+) of the Common Criteria (CC) standard used by Feds the world over. This security seal of approval covers SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 running on IBM's Intel and AMD-based xSeries servers.

This is a nice milestone for Linux, although the operating system still has a ways to go before it unseats more readily used OSes. All of the major versions of Unix along with Microsoft's Windows 2000 lay claim to a higher EAL4 certification.

SuSE and IBM hope to remedy this problem together. The companies expect to meet EAL3+ certification and the Common Operating Environment (COE) standard later this year. The COE requirement is unique to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), which, as we all know, is where the big money is these days.

Meeting these requirements should help Linux put more pressure on Unix and Windows in a key market. The open source OS has already marched right into lucrative segments such as financial services, unseating Unix on its way. Now, it's time to say "hello" to Uncle Sam.

For IBM, it appears a Linux push into government contracts will be nothing but gravy. Few tears will be shed if AIX is replaced by SuSE on IBM kit. In addition, it gives the vendor a bit of leverage against rival Sun Microsystems, which enjoys a prominent place with U.S. three-letter agencies.

Sun has just signed on with SuSE as well, but it's hard to imagine these two vendors going through all the security certification hassle together. First off, Sun does not have a comparable x86-based server lineup to IBM. More importantly, Sun wants Solaris to maintain its hold on the data center for now. Linux is fine as a Web or application server, but it has no place deep in the data center.

This isn't a bad strategy for the moment, since it will take SuSE and IBM sometime to meet Solaris on the security standards front. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Cray-cray Met Office spaffs £97m on VERY AVERAGE HPC box
Only 250th most powerful in the world? Bring back Michael Fish
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
Microsoft brings the CLOUD that GOES ON FOREVER
Sky's the limit with unrestricted space in the cloud
'ANYTHING BUT STABLE' Netflix suffers BIG Europe-wide outage
Friday night LIVE? Nope. The only thing streaming are tears down my face
Google roolz! Nest buys Revolv, KILLS new sales of home hub
Take my temperature, I'm feeling a little bit dizzy
Cisco and friends chase WiFi's searing speeds with new cable standard
Cat 5e and Cat 6 are bottlenecks for WLAN access points
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.