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Time looks to India for call centre pilot

Rejects claims of UK job losses

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UK-based Time Computers has rejected claims that outsourcing a tech support call centre to India will lead to job losses in the UK.

Time's 200 call centre staff in Burnley were told on Monday that the PC maker is to use workers in India to handle calls as part of a six month pilot to test the scheme.

Currently, Time provides customer support during office hours. By using staff in India, the company says it will be able to provide around-the-clock support for its customers.

But the Independent Time Employee Forum (ITEF), which has battled hard for union recognition and workers' rights at the company, believes the move will result in job losses in the UK.

In a statement the group said: "ITEF Rejects suggestion that this will be for a trial period only…the truth is evident for everyone to see, that once the call centre in India maximises its productivity, Time Group will dispose of call centre employees in the UK."

A spokesman for the company rejected the claim and told The Register: "We are one hundred per cent committed to our call centre in Burnley." ®

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