Feeds

MIT says RIAA is legally challenged

Keeping students safe

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

After issuing a subpoena to the MIT, the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) finds itself in yet another legal battle as university officials have refused to divulge their students' names. MIT is protecting students suspected of trading copyrighted files, citing privacy concerns and improper legal tactics by the RIAA as a defense.

"MIT of course has a policy of complying with lawfully issued subpoenas," the school said in a statement. "But in this case we have been advised by counsel that the subpoena was not in compliance with the court rules that apply to these subpoenas, and did not allow MIT time to send any notice as the law requires."

In its haste to fine and/or imprison music fans, the RIAA did not give MIT ample time to contact students about the subpoenas.

"A different federal law, the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, prohibits colleges and universities from disclosing information about students except in certain situations. One of the situations is when an educational institution is served with valid subpoenas. However, even when valid subpoenas are served, the law requires the educational institution to give students advance notice of the existence of the subpoenas, so that they can take whatever action they may choose to try to protect their information from disclosure," MIT said.

After suing one P2P site after another, one would have thought the RIAA had mastered the art of IP litigation.

Even Michael Jackson is concerned about the war on music fans. Why do the labels need such aggressive measures in their pursuit of our youth? Why not give universities a bit of time to look after the concerns of their students?

Have we missed something? ®

Related Link

MIT release

Related Stories

RIAA nails 1,000 music-lovers in 'new Prohibition' jihad
Congressman pocketed $18,000 for RIAA 'lobbying trip'
Congress mulls prison terms for KaZaA users
Radio royalties: the ticking timebomb under the RIAA
P2P fans unite, the RIAA fight is on
The RIAA Plays Whack-a-Mole

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Nokia offers 'voluntary retirement' to 6,000+ Indian employees
India's 'predictability and stability' cited as mobe-maker's tax payment deadline nears
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours
«Email? Mais non ... il est plus tard que six heures du soir!»
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.