Feeds

IBM giving SuSE Enterprise Linux away

Go on, give it a try

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

IBM has put on a clean, white glove and given a slap to both Intel's Itanic chip and SCO.

It has started a new Linux giveaway program for customers ready to purchase a pSeries Unix server. Those customers willing to pick up some fresh hardware (up to four processors) can receive a free license for SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8. Estimated value - $2,300.

Customers outside of North America may not apply for the promotion, according to documents seen by The Register.

On one hand, the deal confirms where IBM's Linux loyalties reside. The pSeries 650, 655, 670 and 690 systems are covered. These boxes all run on IBM's own Power4 chip, and there is no mention of Itanic-powered kit in the offer.

"The main purpose behind this is revving up their 64-bit Linux on Power play against Itanium," said Illuminata's Gordon Haff.

IBM is battling with itself and HP in the Itanium market. Big Blue prefers to tout the homegrown Power chip over Intel's beast.

IBM has put a limit of one free SuSE license per IT shop, making the deal more of "give it a try" promotion, as opposed to an all out Linux on Power campaign. This brings us to the second point.

IBM is urging customers to run Linux on one- to four-way servers, which places it at the center of SCO's latest legal grumbles. SCO is upset about the appearance of SMP code in the Linux kernel, which makes the operating system scale well on systems with more than one processor. While SMP work has been going on for a long time at various places, SCO claims its Unix SMP code, in particular, has found its way into Linux and isn't happy about it.

IBM has been at the center of SCO's complaints since day one, so it's amusing, if nothing else, to see the company come out and promote Linux SMP machines.

"The promotion certainly does have the side effect of emphasizing that IBM is serious about enterprise-class Linux," Haff said.

IBM is now fighting a two front battle to keep the momentum of its pSeries systems going, and it's damn fun to watch. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.