Feeds

Trojan infection linked to SA Net bank thefts

Police on trail of single perp

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

New hybrid storage solutions

A Trojan infection has been linked to the theft of hundreds of thousands of rand from Internet accounts held at South African bank Absa.

South Africa's Sunday Times yesterday reported that police are investigating nine cases involving thefts from Absa accounts. Losses reported to the police come in at R230,000 (£18,800) but the Sunday Times says it has evidence that a further R300,000(£24,600), not included in police figures, went missing from the account of one customer who contacted the paper.

Police and bank officials told the paper that criminals used "spy ware" to gain access of victims PCs to swipe Internet banking information and transfer money out of their accounts.

One likely scenario is that crackers targeted customers of Absa, South Africa's largest bank, sending out Trojan horse malware in order to pull off their crimes. This theory might why only Absa customers have reported raids on their accounts thus far.

One victim, Helene van Tonder, a bookkeeper from Bellville, said her R15,000 (£1,230) salary vanished from her account the day after it was paid in. Absa compensated van Tonder for this loss but she still decided to close her account as a precaution.

Police spokesman Riaan Pool said police are working on the theory that a single perpetrator is involved in the crimes. Presumably an audit trail from the transactions will help police narrow down their search for this as yet unknown crim.

Absa's group information security officer, Richard Peasy, told the Sunday Times that the bank's "security systems and processes had alerted the bank to suspicious activity before these clients knew about it.

"The transactions were frozen and the process for dealing with potentially fraudulent transactions was instituted," he said.

However, attorney Harry de Villiers said more than R300,000 from a trust account he administered went missing last week. Closer inspection of account statements revealed this money was used to pay for 15 laptop computers along with a cash transfer to another bank, he added. ®

External Links

'Hacker cleans out bank accounts', South Africa's Sunday Times

Related Stories

Crooks harvest bank details from Net kiosk
Russian hacker breaks into US bank database
Guilty plea in Kinko's keystroke caper
Closing spyware loopholes
Citibank (SA) gags crypto researchers

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.