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Aussie unis ordered to hand over hard drives to labels

Piracy probe

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Shock and Awe is coming to Australia, where the Federal Court in Sydney has ordered three universities to hand over hard drives, CDs and documentation to a recording industry "expert" for examination for evidence of music piracy.

Sony, Universal and EMI are the record labels lined up against the Universities of Sydney, Melbourne and Tasmania. They went to court over "alleged music piracy detected by a routine check on Internet usage", ABC News reports.

Question is: what will the labels do when they find P2P file trading activity? Beat up on the students - their customers - or beat up on the taxpayers who fund the universities? ®

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