Feeds

PS3 memory rumour mill turns again

Leaks and spills

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

gamesindustry.biz logo In the quest to guess what's going to go inside the PlayStation 3, the most useful sources of information so far (aside from Sony's own rumblings about the Cell microprocessor) are the companies contracted to make memory chips for the console.

Once again this week the memory makers appear to have done a convincing leaky sieve impression, with strong rumours suggesting that they have revealed the amount of RAM which the PS3 will contain, and giving an idea of what volume of consoles Sony hopes to manufacture in the first year.

Online sources today report that the console will incorporate four XDR-DRAM chips, for a total of 256MB of main RAM - an eight-fold increase over the 32MB found in the PlayStation 2. The memory bus speed is also significantly faster than the PS2's.

Three memory suppliers working on XDR-DRAM chips are Elpida, Toshiba and Samsung, all of which are expected to supply chips for the PS3 - although only Elpida has been announced as an official supplier so far.

As reported earlier, the three manufacturers will begin bulk production of the RAM in early 2005, and expect to produce some 20 million XDR-DRAM chips within that year - meaning that Sony could potentially build five million units of the PS3 by the end of 2005, enough for a reasonably sized launch (over a million units) in all three major territories.

The yield for 2006 is expected to be in the region of 30 million chips - enough to build 7.5 million PS3s. This is a surprisingly low figure, however - given the speed with which Sony shipped PlayStation 2s in the first year of the console's lifespan. Surely it will hope for more than 12.5 million PS3s on the market by the end of 2006, assuming a late 2005 launch?

Could it be that Sony's ambitious technical specifications for the PS3, featuring leading-edge RAM and CPU technologies, may restrict supplies of the console - or does the giant manufacturer have an ace up its sleeve?

© gamesindustry.biz

Related story

Let's do PS3 launch... in 2005

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.