Feeds

Tomb Raider developer chief quits Eidos board

Heath-Smith, heave-ho

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Games publisher Eidos today announced the immediate departure of Jeremy Heath-Smith from the company's board. Heath-Smith has also stepped down from Core Design's board.

Core Design developed the Tomb Raider series of games, which were published by Eidos. Heath-Smith's role as both Eidos' Global Head of Development and Core's Managing Director is a sign of how intertwined the two companies' fortunes have become as Lara Croft's adventures have propelled both to great success. Indeed, Core is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Eidos.

Image copyright Eidos

Heath-Smith founded Core back in 1988. In 1994, it was taken over by CentreGold, which in turn was bought by Eidos in 1996.

Given how central Core has been to the Eidos story, how can we explain the sudden departure? No reason was given for Heath-Smith's move in the official announcement, and Eidos would not comment any further, referring us back to the terse press release.

Many observers will conclude that the move was forced upon him. A few weeks back, Eidos admitted that last-minute delays to the release of the latest release in the Tomb Raider series, Angel of Darkness, would mean that a significant percentage of the titles sales would have to be included in the company's results for fiscal 2004, not fiscal 2003, which ended on 30 June. The profit warning prompted a ten per cent dip in Eidos' shares.

"While some units may ship within the current financial year, up to one million units will ship in July, the first month of the next financial year," the company said. "This has led the Board to significantly reduce its expectations for profit before tax for the financial year."

Eidos won't say what it expected to earn during 2003, or what it now believes its income will total. Its 2003 results will be announced on 4 September. Analysts were expecting sales of $283-300 million. It's hard to imagine shareholders not demanding the head of someone for the income shortfall. ®

Related Story

Eidos issues profit warning

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.