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MyZones firms up co-op wireless launch

Share your neighbour's broadband

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A package of new EU telecoms legislation coming into effect on July 25 will allow broadband users to share their broadband connection and costs with their neighbours.

The new regulatory legislation will supersede certain of the licensing requirements prescribed in the 1984 Telecommunications Act. The current regulatory regime requires that those operating a 2.4 GHz wireless network comply with the telecoms licensing requirements of the Telecommunications Act.

This applies even to a domestic user operating a wireless home network, according to wireless start-op MyZones.

From July 25 however the licensing requirements will be replaced by a more general 'authorisation' process, allowing MyZones to go live with a service that allows punters to share their broadband costs with their neighbours.

Regulatory requirements - which used to be onerous - seem to have all but disappeared already, judging by comments by a Radiocommunications Agency boss last week.

Speaking at ABC's Rural and Regional Broadband conference, Joe Sonke, head of broadband fixed wireless access at the Radiocommunications Agency, said the 2.4 GHz (802.11b) band is now license-exempt.

MyZones allows customers to share Wi-Fi broadband throughout their own home and also with neighbours who can pick up their Wi-Fi signal. This greatly reduces costs.

A typical MyZones customer would have full always on 512K broadband service for two people sharing at £17.62 per month, three people for £11.74 per month, four people for £8.81 per month (all charges include VAT).

MyZones secure management software allows the MyZones customer to control who they are sharing with, as explained in greater detail in our early article here.

With MyZones home users can create individual user accounts, issue secure passwords and monitor the amount of shared usage - effectively becoming a neighbourhood Internet service provider.

MyZones is supplying an easy plug and play package to make it easier to set up a secure home network.

For £149.95 (including VAT) MyZones will supply a Wi-Fi broadband starter pack including an ADSL modem, Wi-Fi access point, a USB wireless adapter and the MyZones client software. MyZones uses Wi-Fi equipment from Netgear which it is able to supply at far below the recommended retail price.

Clive Mayhew-Begg, CEO of MyZones Ltd, commented: "We have been anticipating this legislation for some time and have been developing the MyZones service to allow our customers to take advantage of such changes. The secure and managed sharing of broadband with housemates and neighbours is set to revolutionise the UK broadband market."

Customers with an existing fixed line broadband service tcan buy a Wi-Fi broadband upgrade pack from MyZones for £99.00 (including VAT). Punters will be charged £11.75 per month to use the secure MyZones software, in addition to their current broadband subscription fee.

The Wi-Fi upgrade customer must check with their existing broadband service provider if their broadband terms and conditions allow sharing before using MyZones' service. ®

External Links

Changes in EU Telecoms' legislation

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