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Kingston targets gamers with 500MHz DDR

World first, apparently

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Memory specialist Kingston Technology yesterday began offering memory modules based on 466MHz and 500MHz DDR SDRAM.

The latter, built to meet PC4000 specifications, is the first of its kind, Kingston claims. The lower-clocked part is a PC3700 module. DDR is typically clocked to 400MHz for inclusion in PC3200 modules. Kingston already offers 434MHz, PC3500 modules.

The modules, to ship under Kingston's HyperX brand, are aimed at overclockers and gamers looking for maximum memory performance. The company said that both modules have been tested and validated at these effective bit rates, but it doesn't recommend their use in mainstream systems. This is "high performance memory and may not be compatible with your computer", Kingston warns.

"Some motherboards or system configurations may not operate at the published HyperX memory speeds and timing settings," Kingston said, and the new modules are compatible with ASUS and ABIT mobos.

The modules operate at 2.65V for low power consumption operation. Both will be offered at 256MB and 512MB capacities. The 256MB PC4000 module costs $112; the 512MB module $218. The 256MB PC3700 module is priced at $99; the 512MB module at $187. ®

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