Feeds

DARPA puts millions in U.S. vendors' pockets

Need for speed

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

DARPA has done its part to keep U.S. computer makers alive and kicking by handing out millions in grants to Cray, Sun Microsystems and IBM.

As part of its High Productivity Computing Systems program, DARPA has kicked down more than $100 million to vendors. The government agency hopes the server makers can come up with some high performance systems by 2009 that will replace today's equipment and serve as stopgaps before quantum computers arrive.

Cray and its New Technology Endeavors subsidiary received $43.1 million to continue with their Cascade computing concept. The idea is to make a peta-scale computer that pays special attention to memory hierarchy, processor-in-memory technology and high memory bandwidth. On the software side, the two companies hope to create code tuned for shared and distributed memory programming models.

Sun, not usually on DARPA's short list, will pull in $49.7 million to further work on the Hero project. This effort seems to play into many of Sun's strengths as its focuses on improving programming tools, boosting system security and supporting legacy software. Sun is to create a system that takes all of these factors into account and that can crank through quadrillions of calculations per second. It's meant to be a a programmers' dream.

IBM, DARPA's darling, will see $53 million pop into its coffers to advance PERCS (Productive, Easy-to-use, Reliable Computing Systems). IBM's main mission is to design systems that have high performance on both scientific and commercial software workloads.

The U.S. government bowed its head in shame when NEC stole the top supercomputer crown with its Earth Simulator System. NEC is poised to hold its top spot for some time, but companies such as IBM are working hard to return prestige to U.S. high performance computing.

Speedy machines are just one facet of the computing efforts being pushed at DARPA. The organization also pays close attention to developing hulking servers that consume as little power as possible. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Bitcasa bins $10-a-month Infinite storage offer
Firm cites 'low demand' plus 'abusers'
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.