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Nvidia ships mobile workstation chip

Quadro FX Go 700

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Nvidia has launched its latest mobile workstation graphics chip, the Quadro FX Go 700, the first part in its class to offer full shader programmability, the company claims.

The 700 is an extension of Nvidia's GeForce FX Go line, adding features of more use to CAD/CAM workers and content creators than to the company's gamer audience, and certified for use with professional apps.

So while Nvidia talks about progammable shaders, exposed through Cg, it doesn't talk about CineFX. And we get references to "12 bits of sub-pixel precision" - which helps remove rasterisation anomalies, such as sparkles and cracks - and "parallelised vertex engines". Actually, we're not even sure 'parallelised' is a real word, but that's by the by. There's an on-chip vertex cache, and like the GeForce FX 5900, it supports eight pixel pipelines for 16 texutures per pixel.

Nvidia already has a customer for the 700, Dell, which began shipping its Precision M60 mobile workstation, which contains the new chip, today. ®

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