Feeds

Nano-technology – more investor folly?

Under the microscope

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Nano-technology, which revolves around the development of even more powerful technologies on a microscopic scale, (the term nano derives from the word nanometer, which is one billionth of a metre), is becoming a fashionable technology topic, writes Bob McDowall, of Bloor Research.

Indeed, it is awaking active investment interest and participation from financial institutions, venture capital companies and more mainstream institutional investors alike. Even the UK Government recently announced plans for an independent study to examine the benefits and risks of nano-technology.

Why is this happening now?

Current technologies will reach their practical commercial limitations in their current form and application over this decade. A breakthrough beyond these constraints opens up a huge range of business opportunities for investors, technology companies and, principally end user commercial and retail consumers.

Some of the strongest proponents of nano-technology view it as "a new industrial revolution" where machines operate on a microscopic scale rather than on a substantial scale.

What are the drivers behind it? This is where there must be some unease. Investors and technologists alike want a share of the commercial success and personal rewards, which they believe, will derive from early technical and subsequent commercial success with this technology. They are seeking a slice of the action; they are fearful they might miss out if they are not early investors in and providers of nano-technology.

Should we be cautious?

The critical issue is to understand the technologies which provide and deliver commercial applications for nano-technology, otherwise the delivery is nothing more or less than pure research; certainly of intellectual value but of unproven commercial application.

The commercial benefits and applications of nano-technology must be examined in the very specific confines of the business to which it is intended to apply them. For example, what may be a commercially successful application in the context of medical science, may not work successfully in the context of the automobile industry.

Is this yet another dot.com bubble?

Bubbles like that are created when greed and enthusiasm substitute for analysis and understanding of the technology and its application and limitations. Viewing nano-technology in terms of blanket commercial applications to enhance the power of technology operating on a microscopic scale is dangerously simplistic.

The danger lies in the possibility of hype from investors, pundits and poorly informed commentators. Education and briefing from technology experts and independent analysts should be applied and will go some way to dispelling any myths about the technology and presenting its application in an appropriate and realistic context.

© IT-Analysis.com

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
XBOX One will learn to play media from USB and DLNA sources
Hang on? Aren't those file formats you hardly ever see outside torrents?
Class war! Wikipedia's workers revolt again
Bourgeois paper-shufflers have 'suspended democracy', sniff unpaid proles
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.