Feeds

3G phones. Another staff headache

No, it's not the radiation

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

A 3G phone could give an unscrupulous employee the opportunity to photograph or film someone in work and send it instantly to a colleague or friend, breaching employee confidentiality.

More seriously, 3G phones could be used as a means of sexual discrimination such as a male employee sending an image of a female colleague to his friends or co-workers.

According to business advisor Croner, bosses need to be aware of 3G mobile phones being used by staff to discriminate or harass their colleagues.

Under current employment legislation the use of mobile phones at work is at the employer’s discretion and it is their responsibility to ensure that employees are made aware of the guidelines.

But despite the new issues presented by 3G phones, the government has no plans to update the law. Therefore Croner urgeds employers to update and clarify existing polices to avoid a potential sex discrimination case.

It advises bosses to base a policy on standard rules of confidentiality and said employers were well within their rights to request their staff do not bring 3G phones to work.

Richard Smith, corporate and training manager and expert in employment law at Croner Consulting, said it would not be long until photo or video messages were used as evidence in a sex discrimination trial, unless businesses updated their policies on the use of 3G phones in the workplace.

“We can make a parallel with the Internet and email – it was virtually unheard of ten years ago for companies to have a policy on the use of Internet and email.

"Nowadays such policies are vital to ensure employees don't spend too long using company resources for personal means, and to avoid the circulation of inappropriate material, such as pornography," he warned.

© Startups.co.uk is the biggest independent small business site in the UK. It has more than 2500 articles covering everything from taking on staff to dealing with VAT.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.