Feeds

802.11g is a standard (official)

Testing begins in earnest

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

The Register's Wireless LAN Channel

The IEEE yesterday finally turned the 802.11g 54Mbps WLAN from a specification to a standard, giving the technology its official blessing.

Final ratification was something of a formality, the 802.11g spec. having barely changed since last year, and the final draft was passed unchanged last month.

Indeed, that the ratification was widely expected is shown by the large number of announcements issued by 802.11g product makers early this week, albeit released under non-disclosure agreements, just in case.

The ratification should now see the release of firmware updates to bring existing 802.11g products, of which there a plenty thanks to the stability of the spec. over the last six months or so, to bring them to full compliance with the standard.

The industry body that oversees 802.11 adherence, the Wi-Fi Alliance, will now begin 802.11g compatibility testing in earnest.

The 802.11g standard describes WLAN raw transmission rates of up to 54Mbps in the 2.4GHz band. Actual data rates, once network protocol overheads have been taken into account are around 20Mbps. Local network conditions may reduce that further, as will the presence of 802.11b nodes. 802.11g uses orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission modulation techniques whereas 802.11b uses complementary code keying (CCK). The new standard specifies full support for CCK to ensure backward compatibility.

Some 802.11g makers have their own techniques - such as Intersil's Nitro - for improving 802.11g performance in mixed-standard networks, but these are not part of the standard and will generally only work where networks contain 802.11g products from the same vendor.

802.11g has had a rocky ride since its inception three years ago. The first draft was fixed in November 2001, but development of the spec. was delayed over wrangling between parties favouring OFDM (led by Intersil) and others touting PBCC (Packet Binary Convolutional Coding) modulation, developed by Texas Instruments. The spec. didn't stabilise sufficiently for chip makers to feel safe offering product until last year, with commercial kit emerging late in 2002.

In addition to 802.11g, the IEEE ratified the 802.11f working practice standard. Dubbed the Inter Access Point Protocol, 802.11f ensures interoperability between access points from multiple vendors to enable client roaming. ®

Related stories

Atheros ships first final-spec 802.11g chip
802.11b chipset prices could fall 75% this year
Wi-Fi Alliance 'caught with pants down' says chip maker
Proxim talks wireless TLAs and security upgrades
US Robotics doubles up on 802.11g data rates
Intersil triples 802.11g data rates
IEEE preps 802.11n 320Mbps WLAN spec

The Register's Wireless LAN Channel

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.