Feeds

802.11g is a standard (official)

Testing begins in earnest

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The Register's Wireless LAN Channel

The IEEE yesterday finally turned the 802.11g 54Mbps WLAN from a specification to a standard, giving the technology its official blessing.

Final ratification was something of a formality, the 802.11g spec. having barely changed since last year, and the final draft was passed unchanged last month.

Indeed, that the ratification was widely expected is shown by the large number of announcements issued by 802.11g product makers early this week, albeit released under non-disclosure agreements, just in case.

The ratification should now see the release of firmware updates to bring existing 802.11g products, of which there a plenty thanks to the stability of the spec. over the last six months or so, to bring them to full compliance with the standard.

The industry body that oversees 802.11 adherence, the Wi-Fi Alliance, will now begin 802.11g compatibility testing in earnest.

The 802.11g standard describes WLAN raw transmission rates of up to 54Mbps in the 2.4GHz band. Actual data rates, once network protocol overheads have been taken into account are around 20Mbps. Local network conditions may reduce that further, as will the presence of 802.11b nodes. 802.11g uses orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission modulation techniques whereas 802.11b uses complementary code keying (CCK). The new standard specifies full support for CCK to ensure backward compatibility.

Some 802.11g makers have their own techniques - such as Intersil's Nitro - for improving 802.11g performance in mixed-standard networks, but these are not part of the standard and will generally only work where networks contain 802.11g products from the same vendor.

802.11g has had a rocky ride since its inception three years ago. The first draft was fixed in November 2001, but development of the spec. was delayed over wrangling between parties favouring OFDM (led by Intersil) and others touting PBCC (Packet Binary Convolutional Coding) modulation, developed by Texas Instruments. The spec. didn't stabilise sufficiently for chip makers to feel safe offering product until last year, with commercial kit emerging late in 2002.

In addition to 802.11g, the IEEE ratified the 802.11f working practice standard. Dubbed the Inter Access Point Protocol, 802.11f ensures interoperability between access points from multiple vendors to enable client roaming. ®

Related stories

Atheros ships first final-spec 802.11g chip
802.11b chipset prices could fall 75% this year
Wi-Fi Alliance 'caught with pants down' says chip maker
Proxim talks wireless TLAs and security upgrades
US Robotics doubles up on 802.11g data rates
Intersil triples 802.11g data rates
IEEE preps 802.11n 320Mbps WLAN spec

The Register's Wireless LAN Channel

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
HBO shocks US pay TV world: We're down with OTT. Netflix says, 'Gee'
This affects every broadcaster, every cable guy
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.