Feeds

SCO's Second Amendment rebuffs Novell Unix claim

But good enough?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The army of paper shufflers beavering away at the SCO Group has managed to unearth a 1996 amendment powerful enough to block some of Novell's Unix claims.

Amendment No. 2 found in a SCO file-cabinet last week appears to have to set us back where we started in the Unix/Linux ownership saga. The document alters a provision in the 1995 Asset Purchases Agreement between Novell and SCO that nixed Unix copyrights from changing hands. SCO is now saying the amendment confirms that Unix copyrights have been safely secured.

"There's nothing really new today," said Gordon Haff, an analyst at Illuminata . "Though it does look like we're back to where we were a week or so ago and that SCO really does own the right to AT&T Unix."

Novell has been trying to spoil SCO's billion dollar attack on IBM. Last month, Novell argued that it did not agree to transfer copyrights and patents for Unix System V to SCO.

Now, however, the company has been forced to back off a tad.

"The amendment appears to support SCO's claim that ownership of certain copyrights for Unix did transfer to SCO in 1996," Novell said in a statement.

Even with the setback, Novell is still slinging challenges at SCO and its IP crusade.

"The amendment does not address ownership of patents, however, which clearly remain with Novell. Novell reiterates its request to SCO to address the fundamental issue Novell raised in its May 28 letter : SCO's still unsubstantiated claims against the Linux community."

It's an amazing coincidence that a SCO paralegal could find such a helpful document so quickly after Novell voiced its complaints. SCO's paperwork precision is clearly getting to the Linux zealots, as one jumped on a SCO conference call, pretending to be an analyst.

The faux "George Weiss" from Gartner demanded that SCO explain what it is trying to accomplish as an IP shop. Some real analysts on the call appreciated the imposter's direct line of questioning.

"There is the very real question that SCO has never answered which is 'what do they want out of this?'" said Illuminata's Haff. "Protecting your IP is fine, but what do you want?" ®

Related Stories

Novell torpedoes SCO's Unix IP claim
Lindows.com claims SCO immunity via Caldera deal
MS blesses SCO, licenses Unix

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?