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NEC UK beats Intel to launch 1.7GHz Pentium M

Unannounced CPU announced in new notebook

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NEC UK has thoughtfully pre-announced Intel's upcoming 1.7GHz Pentium M processor, but revealing the new chip - due to launch next week - will power its Versa P600 laptop.

The P600 will, to quote the NEC UK release, "integrate an Intel Pentium M processor running at speeds of up to 1.7GHz". It's based on Intel's 855GM chipset.

NEC's new machine also sports up to 60GB of hard disk storage, up to 1GB of 266MHz DDR SDRAM in two SO-DIMM slots (the base amount is 256MB) and a combo DVD/CD-RW optical drive. There are three USB 2.0 ports, one 1394 connector, but no legacy parallel and serial ports. There's VGA out and a single Type II PC Card slot.

The screen is a 14.1in 1024x768 LCD driven by the chipset's integrated graphics. Some 32MB of system memory is allocated to the graphics sub-system's frame buffer.

The notebook contains a built-in 56Kbps modem, 10/100 Ethernet and Intel's Pro Wireless mini-PCI card for 802.11b Wi-Fi connections. NEC is offering Gigabit Ethernet as an optional extra.

The notebooks weighs 2.4kg, and measures 30.8 x 26.8 x 2.8cm. Prices start at £1199 excluding VAT, but that's for a 1.4GHz model - as we went to press, prices were not available for the 1.7GHz version. ®

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