Feeds

Paris moots city-wide Wi-Fi

Metro piggyback

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The Register's Wireless LAN Channel

A French telco is to assess the feasibility of setting up a city-wide public Wireless LAN (WLAN) network for Paris.

The company, Naxos, is to piggyback off the data networking cabling system installed in the Paris Metro to deliver Wi-Fi access points above ground in a year-long trial.

The pilot, dubbed WIXOS (Wi-Fi eXtensible aux Operateurs de Services), is limited in scope - 12 locations along the Bus 38 route, which connects the Gare du Nord and Porte d'Orleans, a major bus terminus.

But if it all works out, Naxos will roll out Wi-Fi throughout the city, underground as well as above. Some of the big Metro stations could have up to ten access points on each concourse, says Pierre Marteau, vice president of Naxos and Telcite,

It could be pie in the sky. But Paris, compact and with a ready-made networking infrastructure supplied courtesy of the Paris Metro, means that there should be little in the way of technical barriers.

No, the big problem is making it pay. Bouygues Telecom, T-Online's Club Internet, TELE2, TLC Mobile and WIFI Spot are all taking part in the pilot. So Perhaps a single, big Wi-Fi network will encourage the service providers to team up for seamless roaming.

As a rich metropolis, with millions of overseas visitors, including tens of thousands of business people, Paris is the ideal place to test of public WLANs, as a business proposition. If it can't work here, God help everywhere else.

Naxos is a subsidiary of Regie Autonome des Transports Parisiens (RATP), the Independent Paris Transport Authority. The Paris Metro cabling is based on Cisco metro Ethernet switching.

The pilot kicks off with 24 Cisco Aironet 1200 Wi-Fi Access points which are hidden behind fixtures and fittings - such as the Metro station signs. They hook up to a Gigabit Ethernet loop with one Catalyst 2950 switch at each station except for Chatelet. Here
a Catalyst 3550 Ethernet switch acts as the network. ®

Related story

Public Wi-Fi has look and feel of a dead duck

The Register's Wireless LAN Channel

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.