Feeds

Logitech to offer Mac OS X digicam drivers

Pocket Digital no longer PC-only

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Logitech will tomorrow release drivers allowing Mac OS X users to download pictures taken with the company's credit card-sized Pocket Digital camera, The Register has learned.

Sources close to the company say the drivers, which work with Mac OS X's Image Capture application and iPhoto, will be offered free of charge as a download from the company's

web site

.

It's not clear at this stage whether Logitech will bundle the new drivers with the camera and brand it as a Mac-compatible product.

Launched a year ago as a Windows-only product, the 0.5in-thick Pocket Digital contains a 640x480 camera but can interpolate images up to 1.3 megapixels. The camera doesn't have a flash, but it uses software to automatically adjust the image in overly dark or bright conditions. There's enough memory to store 52 pictures, which can be copied over to a PC via a USB link. The same connection is used to recharge the Pocket Digital's built-in rechargeable Lithium-polymer battery.

The Pocket Digital retails for around $99.95 in the US and £119.99 in the UK. ®

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?