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Elpida DDR 2 SDRAM fit for future Intel server chipsets

Twin Castle and Lindenhurst due during 2H 2004

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Update Elpida has finally figured out how to do DDR 2 SDRAM for Intel servers, the company announced this past Friday. It said its 512Mb 533Mbps DDR2 chips has passed all of Intel's tests and would be available to be used in Intel servers next year.

The memory is likely to be used in Intel's upcoming server chipsets Twin Castle and Lindenhurst, both mentioned by chip behemoth during February's Intel Developers Forum. It also said that both chipsets will use DDR 2 memory.

Lindenhurst has been designed for two-way servers, Twin Castle for four-way machines. They will work with processors codenamed Nacona and Potomac, respectively. Both chipsets will support PCI Express, the next-generation PCI bus designed to replace PCI, PCI-X and AGP.

An ExtremeTech story cites an Intel spokeswoman who said the two chipsets will ship in the second half of 2004.

Elpida's 400Mbps and 500Mbps 512Mb DDR 2 chips are sampling now for $120 a pop. Volume production will begin this summer, the company said. The chips are fabbed at 0.11 micron on 300mm wafers.

Elpida is working in DDR2 SDRAM parts for PC2-5400 667Mbps DIMMs. ®

Related Link

ExtremeTech: Intel tips DDR-2 server chipset plans

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