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Apple updates eMac to 1GHz

Ready for 802.11g too

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Apple has updated its eMac all-in-one desktop Mac. The new line-up sports ATI Radeon 7500 graphics and Airport Extreme 802.11g wireless networking. The eMac range now includes a 1GHz G4 processor, as predicted a wee while ago by our chums at Think Secret.

The three-machine line-up offers 40, 60 and 80GB hard drives, and CD-ROM, DVD/CD-RW combo and DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive, respectively. The SuperDrive now offers 4x DVD-R, twice the speed of the previous eMacs' SuperDrive. The low-end machine has an 800MHz G4, the other two use the 1GHz processor. All three machines CPU's contain 256KB of on-die L2 cache.

Each machine has a 133MHz system bus. The lower two models ship with 128MB of PC-133 SDRAM, the top-end box with 256MB. Memory can be increased to 1GB.

Like earlier eMacs, the new three feature a built-in 17in flat CRT. They also contain an 802.11g/b-rated antenna and are ready to take Apple's AirPort Extreme 802.11g add-in card. Each machine also supports 10/100Mbps Ethernet and features a built-in 56Kbps modem.

Prices for the three machines are $799/£699, $999/£799 and $1299/£999, respectively and are available now. ®

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