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First pictures of a personal mobile gateway phone from Samsung

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Samsung PMG Open

Samsung is backing every horse in the experimental battle to produce a next generation mobile device; and recently, it became the first mainstream phone builder to produce a PMG - a Personal Mobile Gateway.

Our picture shows the first model to emerge from Samsung, due for sale some time later this year.

The phone is a half-way house between a proper PMG, which IXI software demonstrated at the 3GSM congress in Cannes this year, and a smartphone.

Samsung PMG Flipped

A true PMG has no visible functions - no moving parts, no display, no keyboard, no audio and is able use wireless Bluetooth technology to control several other peripherals, or "sleeks" - units which perform specialist functions like voice, or display, or gaming, or photography.

By contrast, this PMG phone is able to drive other "sleek" devices, but is also a standalone phone in its own right. Samsung is predicting that people may forget to take something as esoteric as a PMG with them when they go out, but will never forget their phone.

© NewsWireless.Net

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