Feeds

EMC to roll out Windows-based storage system

Jumps in the SAK with Microsoft

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

EMC Corp. has given in and decided to start shipping Windows-based network attached storage (NAS) systems alongside its own Celerra hardware.

The NetWin 200 system will start shipping in the third quarter, starting at $50,000. Even with this price-tag, the box fits into the low end of EMC's NAS line. The higher end Celerra systems serve as NAS gateways to EMC's Clariion and Symmetrix products and start close to $167,000.

By contrast, the NetWin 200 puts a server with Windows SAK(server appliance kit) in front of one of EMC's Clariion CX systems. The NetWin 200 product can be managed from Windows or EMC's ControlCenter software.

It's only taken Microsoft a few years to pry its way into the NAS market. Market leader Network Appliance continues to go the non-Windows route, but the biggest hardware vendors have sided with Redmond. EMC joins HP, Dell, IBM and Iomega as Windows SAK vendors.

Outside of hardware, Microsoft and EMC have worked together for some time on software engineering efforts. The companies are rumored to have interesting projects underway involving tie ins between EMC's software and Microsoft's upcoming Windows Future Storage (WinFS) file system that will sit at the heart of future versions of Windows and SQL Server.

The vendors solidified their commitment publicly on Monday, as EMC also announced it will integrate Microsoft's storage APIs into its own platforms. This will give Windows users the ability to have more sophisticated management controls of EMC hardware, and will give EMC ControlCenter users deeper access into the Windows-powered kit.

EMC has also signed an agreement under Microsoft's Communication Protocol Licensing Program (MCPP) to ensure protocol interoperability between EMC's NAS systems and Windows-based PCs, the vendors said.

The deal shows that EMC needs help stretching down to the low end of the storage market, and, in particular, could use a boost for its flagging NAS business, which showed a double-digit drop in revenue year-on-year. ®

Related Stories

EMC back in the black
EMC grabs Astrum Software
EMC chief cashes in on losses
EMC and Hitachi kiss and tell

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.