Feeds

EMC to roll out Windows-based storage system

Jumps in the SAK with Microsoft

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

EMC Corp. has given in and decided to start shipping Windows-based network attached storage (NAS) systems alongside its own Celerra hardware.

The NetWin 200 system will start shipping in the third quarter, starting at $50,000. Even with this price-tag, the box fits into the low end of EMC's NAS line. The higher end Celerra systems serve as NAS gateways to EMC's Clariion and Symmetrix products and start close to $167,000.

By contrast, the NetWin 200 puts a server with Windows SAK(server appliance kit) in front of one of EMC's Clariion CX systems. The NetWin 200 product can be managed from Windows or EMC's ControlCenter software.

It's only taken Microsoft a few years to pry its way into the NAS market. Market leader Network Appliance continues to go the non-Windows route, but the biggest hardware vendors have sided with Redmond. EMC joins HP, Dell, IBM and Iomega as Windows SAK vendors.

Outside of hardware, Microsoft and EMC have worked together for some time on software engineering efforts. The companies are rumored to have interesting projects underway involving tie ins between EMC's software and Microsoft's upcoming Windows Future Storage (WinFS) file system that will sit at the heart of future versions of Windows and SQL Server.

The vendors solidified their commitment publicly on Monday, as EMC also announced it will integrate Microsoft's storage APIs into its own platforms. This will give Windows users the ability to have more sophisticated management controls of EMC hardware, and will give EMC ControlCenter users deeper access into the Windows-powered kit.

EMC has also signed an agreement under Microsoft's Communication Protocol Licensing Program (MCPP) to ensure protocol interoperability between EMC's NAS systems and Windows-based PCs, the vendors said.

The deal shows that EMC needs help stretching down to the low end of the storage market, and, in particular, could use a boost for its flagging NAS business, which showed a double-digit drop in revenue year-on-year. ®

Related Stories

EMC back in the black
EMC grabs Astrum Software
EMC chief cashes in on losses
EMC and Hitachi kiss and tell

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.