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Dell targets gamers with consumer 800MHz FSB kit

Intel's latest chipset and ATI's Radeon 9800 Pro

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Desktop PC

Dell has introduced its most powerful consumer desktop, the Dimension XPS. Based on Intel's 800MHz frontside bus Pentium 4 running at 3GHz and Intel's i875P chipset, and with a 128MB ATI Radeon 9800 Pro graphics card and Creative Audigy 2 sound card, the box is aimed squarely at gamers.

More consumer-friendly features include two 1394 ports and eight USB 2.0 ports. 10/100Mbps Ethernet is built in. The system can be ordered with up to 200GB of Ultra ATA-100 storage, and you can have Serial ATA and RAID support via an optional controller card. Optical drives options include: 16x DVD, 48x/24x/48x CD-RW, and 48x CD-RW/DVD, DVD+RW/ +R combo drives.

All of this is backed by a 460W power supply, fitted into the bottom of the mini-tower case rather than the top. The result, claims Dell, is a quieter system and one whose internal workings are more easily accessed - a boon for the upgrade-crazy hardcore gamer.

Pricing depends on configuration, but a model with 256MB of 400MHz DDR SDRAM, 60GB hard drive 16x DVD, 19in CRT display, Radeon 9800 and Windows XP Home edition costs $2199. ®

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