Feeds

Leave your Cisco WiFi mobile phone at the door

Talk time

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Cisco has demonstrated a mobile phone that uses 802.11 wireless ethernet for use on "campus networks", which means enterprises with WiFi access.

It's more of a walkie-talkie replacement than what we recognize as a real mobile phone, but the importance of this convergence moshpit should not be underestimated.

It isn't the first, by a long chalk. Symbol is just one of several vendors to market WiFi phones, announcing its own two years ago, but the market has failed to ignite.

Cisco claims that the 7920 - which looks like an early 90s GSM handset, only uglier - has two hour talktime and twenty four hours of standby time.

The savings are obvious: while in your office, you don't need to pay expensive landline or cellphone fees. Assuming your Internet connection is up to the job. Cisco says QoS is guaranteed with the 7920 - the mobile counterpart to its 7620 VoIP handset - but we'd like to like to hear what it sounds like with a saturated T1 serving an office of say 500 users, all talking simultaneously, with a BoFH downloading a set of Debian ISO images.

The drawbacks are equally obvious: you have to leave your phone at the door.

And the spectrum efficiencies and manufacturing economies of scale of the 2.5G and 3G digital technologies mean that the traditional mobile phone will never go away. Not for all the wishful thinking in the world.

Ericsson this week announced a dual-mode chipset for the Chinese market that combines CDMA2000 with 802.11, a much more promising combination. This combination of 3G plus WiFi has the best of both worlds: you don't pay exorbitant rates for data when you're in range of a friendly 802.11 base station, and you don't need to carry two (or three) phones.

The downside is cost: WiFi chipsets are eight to ten times more expensive than 2G voice chipsets.

But don't forget the fight taking place over the "last yard". This is an area both WiFi advocates and 3G evangelists both want to ignore. Thanks to Bluetooth, my phone can piggyback onto my DSL connection so I can use it to surf the web with Opera at high speed, bypassing the 4MB cap AT&T Wireless places on my phone's GPRS data usage. (It's a financial cap rather than physical limitation: once you go over the monthly fee, you pay a hefty amount for the extra bytes).

However, the vociferous (and well-funded) spectrum deregulation lobby in these United States is talking such nonsense, we must address this issue in more depth. Soon, m'dears, but not today. ®

Related Stories

Apple boosts Bluetooth - Bluetooth boosts Apple
What the hell is a 'proximity server', and why should you care?
Suddenly, the personal phone hub is respectable
Become a wireless ISP for $300 (Meshbox)
US wireless gurus battle ghosts of VC past
Under-fire and unrepentant: American tech VCs turn nasty

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?