Feeds

AMD: the 64-bit battle

Optimism

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

AMD's ambitions for Opteron have been widely broadcast. It hopes the chip will secure its entry to the lucrative corporate market, in servers and high-performance computers.

Few debutantes would want to want to make their entry on to the world stage at such an uncertain time. If a struggling IT market and sluggish economy wasn't enough, the current war in Iraq adds a special gloom to the proceedings.

There are some factors in AMD's favor. PC sales have been in the doldrums for some time now, to put it mildly. However, there is a feeling that the long-awaited PC upgrade cycle has finally begun. Perhaps AMD will once again be able to exploit a price advantage over Intel even as budgets loosen slightly. Its claim that Opteron offers a more orderly transition to 64-bit computing may also attract the attention of companies that are wary of sudden technological leaps in the current market.

On the other hand, battered CIOs and CTOs may opt for a conservative approach. If they feel they need to move to 64-bit computing at all, they may opt for one of the established players, IBM or Sun, or simply bow to what Intel says is the inevitable and opt for Itanium. So far, the roll-out of Intel's Itanium appears to resemble the US airline industry - lots of pilots but little real business being done. But Microsoft will launch a 64-bit version of Windows XP this month. The advent of a (potentially) mass-market operating system should convince the likes of Dell to get on board the Itanium bandwagon.

It's hard to see AMD winning an outright victory over Intel in the 64-bit market. But then again, AMD has never decisively won in the 32-bit market either. Rather, it survived by offering a cost-effective alternative, and because, let's face it, people like an underdog. The corporate market is not big on emotional responses to technology though. As AMD hands round the chips at Opteron's coming-out party, some may feel a more appropriate moniker for its new baby would have been Optimism.

© datamonitor logo

Datamonitor is offering Reg readers some of its technology research FOC. Check it out here.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.