Feeds

Schools use SMS to fight truancy

Oi u ltl sh*t, get bk 2 skool now

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Parents of kids playing hookey in Yorkshire are to be told their little darlings are skipping school - by text.

A trial in the East Riding of Yorkshire will enable schools to broadcast texts from a PC to parents informing them of all the latest info from school.

Text alerts could be about class closures or up-and-coming school events. But the 'edutxt' service could also be used for teachers to tell parents that their kids haven't shown up at school.

Those behind the trial reckon the service could help reduce the workload for those people running schools. And they say that schools have the choice of paying for the texts themselves, or getting parents to pay.

Other 'edutxt' services currently being considered include a scheme for pupils to use text chat and SMS messages to learn together in different school subjects.

Oh, and another idea is an idea to send a series of 'revision tips' to youngsters studying for exams. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?