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Acer preps cut-price PocketPC

Sub-$300 n10

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PDA

Acer yesterday extended its PocketPC PDA range at the low end with the n10, a budget machine set to cost under $300 when it ships next month.

Betting both ways, Acer also offers the s series of Palm OS-based handhelds.

The n10 is more curvaceous - ie. consumer-friendly - than its higher-end siblings. It's based on a 300MHz Intel PXA255 processor - the n20 and n20w are both based on the 400MHz version of the chip. All three machines offer 64MB of RAM.

Like the n20 and n20w, the n10 has a 240x320 16-bit colour display, but at 3.5in, it's slightly smaller than the other machines 3.8in panels. It contains built-in Compact Flash I/II and SD/MMC slots.

The n10 will initially be launched in the Taiwanese market for NT$10,000 ($288).

Display

Formac has launched what it claims is the first pro-oriented 20.1in LCD panel for under $1000, the $999 Oxygen 2010. It's also offering the 17.4in Oxygen 1740 for $499

It's a promotional price, of course, and the $999 offer ends on 15 April, after which the 2010 price rises to $1149 and the 1740 to $599. That's the date both panels ship - today's price is a pre-order teaser. ®

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